Sarah and Diamond Dog in the woods

Sarah and Diamond Dog in the woods

I never intended to get into botany. It happened because I was a bit lazy my freshman year of college: by the time I got around to finding an on campus work study job, all the positions had been filled. They directed me across the street to the Carnegie Museum where I worked for the Botany Department for over two years in order to defray college costs. I started out in data entry, but quickly graduated to herbarium specimen mounting and repair. Since then I have worked at a number of different botanic gardens and arboreta, broadening my knowledge of plant ID and sharpening my mounting skills. When I moved to Philadelphia, I was fascinated with the new plants I found. I spent my first summer getting to know the weeds in my neighborhood as well as the mix of native and exotic wildflowers growing throughout Fairmount Park. To help me learn, I started to bring specimens home to press. It worked. It also drove my Craigslist roommates crazy as I had drying racks, presses, and papers with plants affixed in every available corner of the house. Eventually, I started framing them and giving them away to friends and family as gifts. A business was born.

I also teach the occasional workshop on flower pressing or terrarium making, host terrarium parties, and can be hired for windowbox and small city garden planting and design. Basically, if it involves me playing in the dirt, I’m in.

If you are still interested in the process of what I do, feel free to check out the blog where I update what large scale projects I’m working on and share photos from my collection trips. Or if you’re more of a social media type, I’m on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram (however, full instagram disclosure: you’ll see a lot more photos of my dog). Still want more? Well, I’m also working on my own side project called Sarah Sexy Plants where I’ve been researching the human uses of plants with regard to human sexuality and posting my findings. Should I be in grad school? Probably.